DIY Jewelry Holders

Every girl needs a storage system for her jewelry – and these are the perfect, rustic piece. The great thing about using a mixture of decorative knobs is that you can put together ANY look you like. No need to be limited by what’s in stock (pre-made) at the craft store, you can easily put together one of these with a piece of scrap wood and your own choice of 4-6 knobs or drawer pulls.

Mine usually range in size from 4″ tall to 12-18″ long depending on how many knobs I’ve picked out to use. My favorite spacing between the knobs is usually 3″ on center from one knob to the next. (Give yourself a little more room if you’re using oversized knobs or odd shapes) There are a MILLION distressing tutorials out there on the web- why write another one? 🙂 The other option you have is to paint chevron on the back (see below), or use barnwood. That’s the other beautiful thing about doing it yourself … 🙂 🙂

On the back these are finished with two sawtooth hangers for easy installation.

On the back these are finished with two sawtooth hangers for easy installation.

If you’re like most people and you want to pick your knobs (but don’t want to mess with drilling holes and distressing wood) you can always hire us to build you one. 🙂 

Adorable in turquoise and orange, the owl is the perfect focal point!

Adorable in turquoise and orange, the owl is the perfect focal point!

Rustic barnwood and red knobs give this one a classic look with a twist - the little brass hook at the end for larger necklaces and bracelets.

Rustic barnwood and red knobs give this one a classic look with a twist – the little brass hook at the end for larger necklaces and bracelets.

Yellow and blue for Spring, of course! The distressing shows mainly on the edges of this board because it's only 3" tall.

Yellow and blue for Spring, of course! The distressing shows mainly on the edges of this board because it’s only 3″ tall.

This one is 5" tall and only 12" long, because we used fewer knobs. That pink oval is just perfect.

This one is 5″ tall and only 12″ long, because we used fewer knobs. That pink oval is just perfect.

Confession: I love making these. They are quick and easy and gorgeous no matter what combination you end up with. 🙂

~ The Woodworker’s Wife

A Little Bit of Husker Curb Appeal …

Husker Football is kind of a big deal around here. Okay, that was an understatement: it’s part of our identity. We’ve made a lot of different (adorable) doorhangers, but these two are my personal favorites. Why? There’s just something about chevron and Huskers, right?

A touch more subtle in grey chevron, the message is still clear: Forever a Husker!

Both of these designs were dictated by the customer – and both of them are beautiful! I painted them with your standard acrylic craft paint, then sealed both sides with three coats of matte spray sealer. Just in case you can’t protect them with a storm door, the sealer keeps the moisture out (and the wood underneath from warping!).  The finishing touch is a simple knotted twine hanger. Rustic perfection. 🙂

Red chevron screams "Huskers!" and we added the perfect bit of silver sparkle on top.

Barn wood tool caddy show-off ….

So this might just be a shameless brag post, but I had to share. 🙂 Last Winter I made a few of these caddys and they were quick, easy, rewarding and very useful! I have three of them, one for paint supplies, one for extra paper plans and drawings, and one that just looks pretty upstairs.  There are endless uses for these guys … and they are so easy to build! 

Here they are, in all of their glory. They were constructed from local barn wood, salvaged by my husband and I just a few months ago. I took 80 grit sandpaper and hit all the boards on both sides to clean some of the dirt and grime off the surface. A light touch did the trick – without taking all of that beautiful, grey, old weathered look off the wood. The table legs were cleaned and prepped also – and that will be a separate post. 🙂 

Once the wood is ready, I simply cut the bottom and sides down to the same length (checking the width, but since these were salvaged boards, I didn’t want to cut any exposed edges). The larger caddy is 16″ long, and the sides I cut somewhere between 12 and 13″ high, cutting a 45 degree angle off of each corner for a more rustic look. Then fire up the nail gun and go to town! 🙂 

The handles were pre-drilled and then glued and screwed in from the outside of the caddy. Very strong and sturdy – our football-player-sized brother sat on it and it survived. 🙂 Seriously. 

But what you really want are the pictures… so here they are! This set of two were custom made for my sister-in-law. Doesn’t she have good taste? 

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Don’t you just love how OLD they look? We rescued those table legs out of grandma’s basement and gave them new life. There’s nothing more satisfying than giving something beautiful a brand new life! 

~ The Woodworker’s Wife 

Wood Crates- to stain or not to stain?

So I’ve been having this mental debate with myself for months… should I stain them? Will it really look different? is it worth the extra time and smell? Does anyone else even notice these kinds of things? Or is this just a wood-nerd thing? 🙂 

I decided that it was best just to try it out and see. I have three of our “early” crates that we built last summer, and they are definitely not the prettiest ones we’ve made. On the other hand, they have screw heads exposed and the ends are solid, so they have a very tough, rustic appeal. The problem was that they had stamps on the ends (from the lumber yard, only the slats were reclaimed wood), and some neon orange markings of some kind. Yuck! 

You’ll have to forgive me… my computer is in the shop so I don’t have a “real” before picture, but this is basically what plain, standard pine looks like in it’s natural state:

 

I took the plunge. I love the result!! 

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The ends got sanded with the palm sander until the markings were (mostly) gone. Then I applied a really heavy coat of Minwax Stain (Early American is the color, if you’re wondering). I let the stain sit on the wood while I worked over the rest of the crate – so that when I went back to wipe off the excess, there was hardly anything left to remove. What a difference it makes! 

You don’t have to seal over the stain – it’s a moisture barrier on it’s own. Just be sure to let it dry overnight (or at least 8 hours) before handling and storing things inside. 

I like them so much now they are in the living room, full of books. 🙂 

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What do you think? To stain or not to stain? 

~ The Woodworker’s Wife 

 

Rustic Coat Racks Find a Home.

I just had to share these pictures with you. After making a coat rack for the Fire Station, we made two more for one of the Fireman who is stationed there. He was kind enough to share some pictures of the coats racks in their home. I love it! 

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There’s nothing better than seeing your hard work being enjoyed by a friend, in their home. 🙂 

~ The Woodworker’s Wife