Wooden Crates – home made storage!

Remember those crates we made? It was the first post on the blog… and you can see it here. ย We continue to tweak and change how we put the crates together – hoping to make them more user friendly and storage capable. I think these are the best set so far!

This set of three crates were created especially for our sister for Christmas. We loved making them!

This set of three crates were created especially for our sister for Christmas. We loved making them!

The crates are constructed from pine (ends) and the slats are all reclaimed cottonwood.

The crates are constructed from pine (ends) and the slats are all reclaimed cottonwood.

We attached this star ornament just for fun. It's a piece that he cut out on the scroll saw, of course.

We attached this star ornament just for fun. It’s a piece that he cut out on the scroll saw, of course.

 

One major change between our first crates and these is that the router was used to round over the top edge of the ends, and even inside the handles. This makes for a much more comfortable grab when you go to pick them up. The cottonwood is lightweight and yet strong enough to handle loads of books! Yes, we have tested them on books. In fact, that’s what ours are loaded with. ๐Ÿ™‚

What would you stock your crates with?

~ The Woodworker’s Wife

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Sharing Barn Wood Ornaments

These were painted by our 5 year old nieces! As you can see, they are creative with color.

These were painted by our 5 year old nieces! As you can see, they are creative with color.

This is just for your enjoyment. Our five-year-old twin nieces painted these one evening at our house. They selected the designs and then went wild with color. After they were finished, I applied a layer of ModPodge over the top to seal in the glitter. It worked! As a bonus, it added a bit of a shine as well.

As you can see, the creative bug runs in the family. ๐Ÿ™‚ ย What creative things does your family do for the Holidays?

~ The Woodworker’s Wife

 

How to Hang Barn Wood on the Christmas Tree

A lovely pair for the Christmas tree - aren't the cut-outs pretty? A touch of sparkle highlights his good detail work with the scroll saw.

A lovely pair for the Christmas tree – aren’t the cut-outs pretty? A touch of sparkle highlights his good detail work with the scroll saw.

He cut this out for me and I added the frosting. Isn't it welcoming?

He cut this out for me and I added the frosting. Isn’t it welcoming?

I cut this one out myself! The glittery hoofs add a little extra sparkle.

I cut this one out myself! The glittery hoofs add a little extra sparkle.

 

These were all crafted from barn wood that we salvaged from an old Corn Crib. Cottonwood is light, strong, and takes paint so very nicely. This year we will have barn wood on the Christmas tree! Is there anything better than a handmade Christmas?

The Reindeer was cut by me! One of my first attempts on the scroll saw, you can tell that I picked a much simpler design than the details that Mr. Woodworker accomplished. Using the scroll saw is so easy and rewarding – it’s rather addictive, actually. Wait until you see what I have in the works for my Christmas decorations … ๐Ÿ™‚ But that’s for another post.

Consider this your daily inspiration.

~ Woodworker’s Wife

 

Scroll Saw Ornaments

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas … everywhere you look … especially in the workshop. My Man is becoming quite skilled with the scroll saw, in everything from original designs to stacking and cutting several layers of plywood at one time. How does he do it?

First, the design. We grabbed some free ones online – you can use silhouettes from a site like shutterstock.com or you can be creative and draw your own. We like to use graph paper to keep things even and symmetrical.

Next, the design is taped onto the plywood using 3m carpet tape (indoor use). Carpet tape is sticky enough to hold the paper, or even multiple layers of plywood together while cutting, and then it comes of cleanly when you’re done!

Now for the cutting! Using a fine, detail blade for thinner wood and smaller details will make a big difference in the final result.

plywood edit

Finally, the finishing. I love to paint the pieces that he makes on the scroll saw … and painting is a great way to add more interest and highlight parts of the design. The best wood for painting is cottonwood – but pine or birch plywood will take the paint as well. When using a nice hard wood like walnut, a simple clear finish will reveal the beauty of the grain.

paint and sparkle edit

two ways

This is just one example of the neat things you can do with a scroll saw. There are plenty of free patterns out there if you don’t feel talented enough to draw your own. We like to do both – and we’ve even used silhouettes from stock sites like shutterstock.com.

I hope you’re inspired to do something special and handmade for Christmas this year. ๐Ÿ™‚

~ The Woodworker’s Wife