Wooden Puzzles – our new adventure with the scroll saw!

Last week we were browsing around (our extensive library of books) and the internet looking for inspiration for new things to add to our skill set (and the shop!). We found a little pot of gold called “scroll saw puzzles.” 🙂 What set of little hands doesn’t love the weight and feel of a piece of wood? Not to mention the fact that puzzles are great for growing minds … and keeping the wood natural means it’s a completely safe, non-toxic toy! Win, win, and win some more.

There are a number of FREE puzzle patterns available to get you started! The cutest one we found was this T-Rex. (This link takes you to a wonderful page with instructions and other designs, as well! Scroll down for the T-Rex.)  We copied him at 100% and used double-sided carpet tape to adhere the design to a scrap piece of 3/4″ pine. Clear pine is great because it’s knot-free, but it’s also a LOT more expensive. Depending on the details in your puzzle, most books recommend plywood for strength. You can use your discretion. For large pieces that don’t have a lot of detail, solid wood should be fine.

Want to find more free puzzle designs for the scroll saw? Check out my board on Pinterest right here! I will be adding more as we find them … 🙂

Ready to see the finished work? Here are a few that we’ve put together this week!

wooden owl puzzle scotty dog puzzle

There are many more to share with you … so consider this post To Be Continued… on Thursday!

~ The Woodworker’s Wife

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A Little Bit of Husker Curb Appeal …

Husker Football is kind of a big deal around here. Okay, that was an understatement: it’s part of our identity. We’ve made a lot of different (adorable) doorhangers, but these two are my personal favorites. Why? There’s just something about chevron and Huskers, right?

A touch more subtle in grey chevron, the message is still clear: Forever a Husker!

Both of these designs were dictated by the customer – and both of them are beautiful! I painted them with your standard acrylic craft paint, then sealed both sides with three coats of matte spray sealer. Just in case you can’t protect them with a storm door, the sealer keeps the moisture out (and the wood underneath from warping!).  The finishing touch is a simple knotted twine hanger. Rustic perfection. 🙂

Red chevron screams "Huskers!" and we added the perfect bit of silver sparkle on top.

Rustic Coat Racks Find a Home.

I just had to share these pictures with you. After making a coat rack for the Fire Station, we made two more for one of the Fireman who is stationed there. He was kind enough to share some pictures of the coats racks in their home. I love it! 

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There’s nothing better than seeing your hard work being enjoyed by a friend, in their home. 🙂 

~ The Woodworker’s Wife 

 

 

DIY Ladder Quilt Rack!

This is one of those things that’s been on my wish list for some time… and once we got started on it, it was so quick to make! Why did I wait so long? Because there are so many good things to make… and so little time. For those of you who don’t know, quilting is my first love. I’ve been quilting for about eleven years now, and I have more than a few quilts to show for it. But where to store them? 

The only real contemporary way to display a quilt is a ladder rack. All those cutesy victorian-style things are just to, well, kitschy for me. My Woodworker has made me proud more than a few times by making quilt racks! I’ll have to share pictures of some of our “old” ones later this week … for now, here’s the newest addition! 

ImageFor those of you who are wood geeks, here are the specs:  The sides are re-claimed barn wood (as you can see), in this case Cottonwood. This is true 2″ x 4″ stock – and once we cleaned it up it ended up being about 1.5″ thick and 3″ wide. The rungs were fashioned out of 2x4s, cut in half and then rounded over on the corners for a softer look. We used a slight 1/8″ round over. Because we’re all about quality, we even cut through the sides and set in the rungs. {You can actually use this ladder as a ladder, people.} The rack is 6 feet tall, and the rungs are 18″ long. We had it together in one evening. 

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Image          Yes, I did make all of these quilts. 🙂 These are the original nail holes in the barn wood – and I LOVE the look of them. 

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This is the perfect marriage of my two favorite things – quilts and barn wood. Yep, this year is off to a good start! 

~ The Woodworker’s Wife 

 

 

Happy New Year {from the Woodworker’s Wife}!

"The One that Got Away," out of birch plywood. We rounded all the edges to give it a finished look.

“The One that Got Away,” out of birch plywood. We rounded all the edges to give it a finished look. 

 

The star is walnut, and the base is birch plywood. This was a gift for my Grandpa, a Koren War Veteran.

The star is walnut, and the base is birch plywood. This was a gift for my Grandpa, a Korean War Veteran.

Happy New Year from me, the Woodworker’s Wife. To ring in the new year, here is a review of a few things that we made for Christmas this year. My brother and my Man worked hard on these, and Grandpa loved them. There’s nothing like giving a gift that’s hand-made. 🙂

As I look forward to the new year, I can see all the beautiful possibilities… we have a huge pile of barn wood in the garage, and I can’t wait to get cracking! I’ll be sharing some of my inspiration with you later this week … 

~ The Woodworker’s Wife

Reclaimed {barn} wood caddy

I am proud to say that these are the first project I have made by myself! Mr. Woodworking could have done these in his sleep… but I am a bit proud of myself for figuring out measurements, using the miter saw, etc. I’m also very pleased with how this entire project was made out of reclaimed lumber! Southern Yellow Pine and Cottonwood, respectively. Two different barns, two different towns, re-made into something for our home. Merry Christmas to me!

The character of the wood is what makes these unique -  this is reclaimed cottonwood from a 100-year-old corn crib... reborn!

The character of the wood is what makes these unique – this is reclaimed cottonwood from a 100-year-old corn crib… reborn!

Southern Yellow Pine has a beautiful grain. This caddy is sturdy, a bit on the heavy side, but so gorgeous.

Southern Yellow Pine has a beautiful grain. This caddy is sturdy, a bit on the heavy side, but so gorgeous!

My little brother came over last week to work on some awesome wood projects for Christmas. Music blaring, good company to work with … and then these just sort of happened. I was scrolling through my Pinterest board for some inspiration and I found this.

Honestly, I like mine better than hers. The reasons are simple: I prefer to have the joinery flush and square. Hers are more rustic in their construction. I also left the real beauty of the wood to show through (nail holes and all!) and I think it lends charm and authenticity to the finished project. What can I say? I think wood-grain is sexy. The handles are antique table legs that we rescued out of Grandma’s basement.

Not bad for an evening of work... reclaimed, reborn barn wood ready for a new life in our home!

I think one of these will be my new gardening companion next Spring…

~ The Woodworker’s Wife

Mod Podge and Glitter Paint!

What began as a simple cottonwood shape is now a pretty, sparkly thing to add to the tree!

What began as a simple cottonwood shape is now a pretty, sparkly thing to add to the tree!

bell ornaments

Jingle bells, jingle bells… these are a wonderful way to showcase pretty scrapbook paper!

 

Just a quick update on what I’m finishing before Christmas arrives! As a last minute perk-up for the tree, I finished these with some pretty paper and glitter glue. There’s really no limit to what you can do with simple wood-shape ornaments! 🙂 I love the vintage look of them… and they are the perfect addition to our mostly-handmade tree.

I confess, I rarely use scrapbook paper for scrap-booking. There are so many other things you can do with it! It’s also a beautiful backdrop for a Christmas scene … but I’m saving that for tomorrow. 🙂 Stay tuned!

~ The Woodworker’s Wife