DIY Jewelry Holders

Every girl needs a storage system for her jewelry – and these are the perfect, rustic piece. The great thing about using a mixture of decorative knobs is that you can put together ANY look you like. No need to be limited by what’s in stock (pre-made) at the craft store, you can easily put together one of these with a piece of scrap wood and your own choice of 4-6 knobs or drawer pulls.

Mine usually range in size from 4″ tall to 12-18″ long depending on how many knobs I’ve picked out to use. My favorite spacing between the knobs is usually 3″ on center from one knob to the next. (Give yourself a little more room if you’re using oversized knobs or odd shapes) There are a MILLION distressing tutorials out there on the web- why write another one? πŸ™‚ The other option you have is to paint chevron on the back (see below), or use barnwood. That’s the other beautiful thing about doing it yourself … πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

On the back these are finished with two sawtooth hangers for easy installation.

On the back these are finished with two sawtooth hangers for easy installation.

If you’re like most people and you want to pick your knobs (but don’t want to mess with drilling holes and distressing wood) you can always hire us to build you one. πŸ™‚Β 

Adorable in turquoise and orange, the owl is the perfect focal point!

Adorable in turquoise and orange, the owl is the perfect focal point!

Rustic barnwood and red knobs give this one a classic look with a twist - the little brass hook at the end for larger necklaces and bracelets.

Rustic barnwood and red knobs give this one a classic look with a twist – the little brass hook at the end for larger necklaces and bracelets.

Yellow and blue for Spring, of course! The distressing shows mainly on the edges of this board because it's only 3" tall.

Yellow and blue for Spring, of course! The distressing shows mainly on the edges of this board because it’s only 3″ tall.

This one is 5" tall and only 12" long, because we used fewer knobs. That pink oval is just perfect.

This one is 5″ tall and only 12″ long, because we used fewer knobs. That pink oval is just perfect.

Confession: I love making these. They are quick and easy and gorgeous no matter what combination you end up with. πŸ™‚

~ The Woodworker’s Wife

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A Little Bit of Husker Curb Appeal …

Husker Football is kind of a big deal around here. Okay, that was an understatement: it’s part of our identity. We’ve made a lot of different (adorable) doorhangers, but these two are my personal favorites. Why? There’s just something about chevron and Huskers, right?

A touch more subtle in grey chevron, the message is still clear: Forever a Husker!

Both of these designs were dictated by the customer – and both of them are beautiful! I painted them with your standard acrylic craft paint, then sealed both sides with three coats of matte spray sealer. Just in case you can’t protect them with a storm door, the sealer keeps the moisture out (and the wood underneath from warping!). Β The finishing touch is a simple knotted twine hanger. Rustic perfection. πŸ™‚

Red chevron screams "Huskers!" and we added the perfect bit of silver sparkle on top.

Reclaimed Wood Porch Pumpkins – Welcome, Fall!

There are so many beautiful things about Fall … cooler weather, evenings with loved ones around the campfire, a mug of hot tea in your cold hands, fuzzy blankets on cold nights … gorgeous rainbow colored leaves falling to the ground! Everything pretty and cozy comes into season for Fall. ❀

I’ve been scanning Pinterest for inspiration on Fall projects. There’s no lack of inspiring photos to get the creative juices flowing!! I found several different versions of reclaimed wood pumpkins (for the front porch!) and decided to give it a try. It’s no coincidence, either, that the very same week that I decided to try out this project, the Woodworker and I decided it was time to sort through our mountains of scrapwood and use it or lose it! πŸ˜‰

This is PERFECT project for scrap wood odds and ends. I used a mixture of scraps (barnwood, pine value board pieces, etc.) and reclaimed cedar fence boards from our neighbor. 20-40 year old cedar boards get that gorgeous grey, worn look to them from living outdoors. The wood-grain sort of becomes “deep” and gives you this awesome texture to work with! But enough words … you want to see pictures, right? πŸ™‚

porch pumpkins trio

I LOVE how these turned out. I truly do. Those nail holes are from the wood’s previous life as a privacy fence. Cool, right? Each pumpkin has a “stand” on the bottom, painted black, that holds it up nicely.

pumpkin duo

wood pumpkins in a row

The pumpkins were painted with acrylic craft paints, then sealed with two coats of water-based poly (which will not yellow over time). They stand roughly 15-20″ tall.

So that’s my version of porch pumpkins!! πŸ™‚ What do you think? If your curious to see my “Pinspiration” you can find that here. I didn’t use her method in constructing mine, but she does have a great tutorial that’s easy to read with great pictures!

Happy Fall!

~ The Woodworker’s Wife

Giant Ruler Growth Charts!!

It’s no secret that these are making a HUGE appearance on Etsy, Pinterest, etc. I had seen them more than a few times and thought, “Wow, that would be easy,” to be followed by, “EIGHTY DOLLARS FOR THAT??!!” (Yes, I am a sort of cheapskate. This comes with being married a very handy, talented man. He builds.) Β We were then asked to make one for a sister-in-law for Mother’s Day. What a great idea! The perfect chance to try this thing out and see what all the fuss is about.

There are many great tutorials out there on making these, and I will not be writing another one for you here. Seems silly. But I will add that if you use a speed square instead of just a plain ruler when marking, you can bee 100% sure that your ruler lines are perfectly straight, square to the board, and also perfect matching lengths across. Speed square also makes adding the numbers EASY. On my ruler I lined them all up to start at 6.75″ away from the left side edge (where the lines are) and then when you stand up the ruler, they are all straight up and down. Very important.

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Another tip I will share with you: use a paint pen! It’s so much easier and more consistent than using a brush to paint the lines on. Beautiful results, and it’s more natural in your hand than a brush.

ImageAnd — The results! Isn’t it adorable?? I’m in love. We’ve sold several of these in our Adoption Shop over on facebook, and have orders for more! Hooray! If you need one, now you know where to look. πŸ™‚

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It’s all in a day’s work … πŸ™‚

~ The Woodworker’s Wife

 

 

Chalkboard Shapes – our DIY gallery

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What do you think of our shapes? I love them all – especially the quote bubble. We’ve sold more than a few of these in the shop already and we’re working on more! Chalkboards are fun and easy (if you have the patience with painting several coats!) and they are so great to use around the house. I’m thinking the nieces and nephews might be getting these for birthdays this year…

What other shapes should we add to the gallery? Trains? Fire Trucks?

~ The Woodworker’s Wife

DIY Shaped Chalkboards

I’ve been painting and cutting out chalkboards for the last few weeks and I’ve learned more than a few things in the process. πŸ™‚ What could be cuter than a shaped chalkboard for a kid’s room? Or in the kitchen? What about one just for leaving notes to your sweetheart in the morning? I saw one on Etsy and just had to try it for myself.

We started with 1/4″ plywood… I penciled the outline of something that resembled my inspiration, and traced it onto the wood. In the same process that used to make the LOVE doorhanger (see my post here), I cut out the shape and then sanded the edges of the shape. There were a couple problems with this method, one of which is splitting veneer. As soon as you cut around the outline, the veneer on the plywood splinters off around curved edges and corner cuts. Then you have to sand/fill to make the surface smooth enough for chalk paint. My solution? Use hardboard instead! Cuts beautifully, no splintering, and the surface is perfectly smooth because it’s a composite product. Also, it’s about half the price. Winning.

Before we get to the pretty, here are a few of my other tips on using chalkboard paint:

1. Apply chalkboard paint (I love Rustoleum, personally) with either a sponge or a dense foam roller for a smooth finish. A roller will give you a more textured finish, where the sponge will give you more “lines” in the finish. It’s whatever you prefer.

2. Apply at least three coats of paint for a good working, erase-able finish.

3. When finishing the back of your board, using a foam roller will be faster, and give you a more even color. You can finish the back in any way you like, but I recommend Rustoleum indoor/outdoor water-based paint. It’s water resistant, dries quickly, and covers well.

4. When you finish painting your three coats (or more if you like), let the paint dry for a good 24 hours. Rub down your entire piece with chalk and then wipe clean. You’ve conditioned the chalkboard paint and it’s ready to use!!

So, how did ours turn out?

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What do you think? They look adorable on the easel stands, but honestly they are not sturdy enough to write on while sitting on them. My next one is going to either get a ribbon hanger, or maybe get mounted on the wall with command strips. Live and learn, right? But I couldn’t be happier with how CUTE they are!!

What other shapes would you make? We made a house, a flower … and I’ll share those with you soon!

~ The Woodworker’s Wife

DIY “LOVE” door hanger

I’ve shared the general pattern with you, now for the process! In case you want to try this yourself, I’m going to show you all the steps that are involved with a simple scroll saw project. πŸ™‚ We begin with the pattern – I typed up “LOVE” in a plain document in 650 pt font size – one letter per page. When you print them out, then tape them together to form a square – as you saw in my earlier post. What happens next? To the plywood!

The pattern is taped to the 1/4″ plywood square (about 18″ square to be precise) using indoor carpet tape. Apply the tape to the plywood first, then remove the paper and smooth the paper pattern onto the tape to secure it to the wood! You can trim the extra tape off if you like so that it doesn’t slow the blade down once you go to cut it on the saw.

Here is the pattern taped down (using double sided carpet tape) and ready to cut with the saw!

Here is the pattern taped down (using double sided carpet tape) and ready to cut with the saw!

Close up of the pattern so you can see the tape. I like to cut away the excess before going to work.

Close up of the pattern so you can see the tape. I like to cut away the excess before going to work.

It's cut out!

It’s cut out! When you’re finished cutting, the carpet tape and the paper pattern will peel off quite easily, and cleanly.

Couldn't resist adding some scrapbook paper and for flair. It's easy to be accurate when you lay the finished wood cutout on top of the paper and trace.

Couldn’t resist adding some scrapbook paper and for flair. It’s easy to be accurate when you lay the finished wood cutout on top of the paper and trace.

As you can see, it’s a process. I also painted the back to make it more weatherproof – because we don’t have a storm door to protect it from the elements. After pasting on the paper with Mod Podge, I sealed it with a gloss spray paint. Makes it shiny and beautiful!

TA-DA!!! Finished!! Just added some sheer ribbon for hanging.

finished love doorhangerThe second one looks totally different and I will share that with you soon! πŸ™‚ I mean, if one is good, two is better, right?

~ The Woodworker’s Wife